Rock ‘n Play sleepers caused 10 infant deaths: CPSC, Fisher-Price

by Kim Boateng Posted on April 6th, 2019

Washington: The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and Fisher-Price warn consumers about the Fisher-Price Rock ‘n Play due to reports of death when infants roll over in the product. According to medical literature, infants typically begin rollover behaviors at 3 months. The CPSC is aware of 10 infant deaths in the Rock ‘n Play that have occurred since 2015, after the infants rolled from their back to their stomach or side, while unrestrained. All 10 infants were 3 months or older.

Because deaths continue to occur, CPSC is recommending consumers stop use of the product by three months of age, or as soon as an infant exhibits rollover capabilities. CPSC has previously warned consumers to use restraints in infant inclined sleep products.

Fisher-Price warns consumers to stop using the product when infants can roll over, but the reported deaths show that some consumers are still using the product when infants are capable of rolling and without using the three point harness restraint.

CPSC and Fisher-Price remind consumers to create a safe sleep environment for infants, whether using a crib, bassinet, play yard, or inclined sleeper: Never add blankets, pillows, stuffed toys, or other items to the environment and always place infants to sleep on their backs.

The Commission voted to publish a finding that the health and safety of the public requires immediate notice.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of injury or death associated with the use of thousands of types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries, and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $1 trillion annually. CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical or mechanical hazard. CPSC’s work to help ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters and household chemicals -– contributed to a decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 40 years.

Federal law bars any person from selling products subject to a publicly-announced voluntary recall by a manufacturer or a mandatory recall ordered by the Commission.

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