‘A New Day Is On The Horizon’ : Oprah Winfrey Rousing Golden Globes speech

by Kim Boateng Posted on January 8th, 2018

Los Angeles, California, USA : Oprah Winfrey became the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award at the 75th annual Golden Globes awards – hosted by NBC late-night veteran Seth Meyers – Sunday night in Los Angeles.

In her acceptance speech, Winfrey delivered an impassioned message about women, equality, saxual harassment and more – a speech so powerful that some are now calling for Oprah for President in 2020.

Beginning with an anecdote from her own life and leading to a story about Recy Taylor, a black woman who never received justice after being molested in 1944, Winfrey stredded the need for change in our society, following the saxual harassment and assault allegations.

“A new day is on the horizon!” promised Winfrey, who noted she was the first black woman to be given the honor.

She finished the speech on an inspirational, uplifting note, highlighting the men and women who are working to flip the script on gender inequality.

Read her full speech below:

“Thank you all. Ok, Ok. Thank you, Reese. In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee, watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th academy awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history: ‘The winner is Sidney Poitier.’ Up to the stage came the most elegant man I had ever seen. I remember his tie was white and of course his skin was black, and I had never seen a black man being celebrated like that and I tried many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid, watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people’s houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation is in Sidney’s perforce in Lilies of the Field: ‘Amen, amen.’

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille Award right here at the Golden Globes and it is not lost on me that at this moment there is some little girl watching as I become the first black woman to be given the same award. It is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who inspired me, who challenged me, who sustained me and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson who took a chance on me for ‘AM Chicago’, Quincy Jones who saw me on that show and said to Steven Spielberg, ‘Yes, she is Sophia in The Color Purple.’ Gayle who’s been the definition of what a friend is and Stedman who’s been my rock, just a few to name.

I’d like to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, because we all know the press is under siege these days. But we also know that it is the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and injustice. To tyrants and victims and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times.

Which brings me to this: What I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have and I’m especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year, we became the story. But it’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry, it’s one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics or workplace.

So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed, bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they’re in academia and engineering and medicine and science. They’re part of the world of tech and politics and business. There are athletes in the Olympics and soldiers in the military.

And there’s someone else: Recy Taylor. A name I know and I think you should know too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and a mother. She was just walking home from a church service she attended at Abbeville, Ala., when she was abducted by six armed white men, molested and left blind folded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone but her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case. They sought justice. But justice wasn’t an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died 10 days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived, as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by the brutally powerful men.

For too long women have not been heard or believed if they dared to speak their truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up! Their time is up. And I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years and even now tormented those marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks’s heart almost 11 years later that she decided to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery, and it’s here with every woman who chooses to say ‘me too’ and every man who chooses to listen.

In my career what I’ve always tried my best do to, whether on television or on film, is to say something about how men and women really behaved. To say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere, how we overcome. I’ve interviewed and portrayed people who withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is the ability to maintain hope or pride of mourning even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here and now to know that a new day is on the horizon!

And when that new day finally dawns it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight and some pretty phenomenal men fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody never has to say ‘me too’ again.

Thank you.”

EARLIER : Golden Globes Winners : Sterling K. Brown Et All – Los Angeles, California, USA : ‘This Is Us’ star, Sterling K. Brown, became the first African American man to win the Golden Globes for best actor in a TV series, at the 75th annual Golden Globes awards – hosted by NBC late-night veteran Seth Meyers – Sunday night in Los Angeles.

In the family drama, ‘This Is Us’, Brown stars as Randall Pearson, the adopted black son of a white family. He reconnects with his biological father (played by Ron Cephas Jones) in the first season and explores being a foster parent in the second.

While accepting his award, Brown thanked his wife, children and castmates (“we take turns leading and supporting one another,” he noted), crew, and especially This Is Us creator Dan Fogelman.

“Now, Dan Fogelman, throughout the majority of my career, I’ve benefited from colorblind casting, which means, hey, let’s throw a brother in there. That’s always really cool. But Dan Fogelman, you wrote a role for a black man that can only be played by a black man. So what I appreciate so much about this is that I’m being seen for who I am and being appreciated for who I am, and it makes it that much more difficult to dismiss me or dismiss anybody who looks like me.”

Brown won an Emmy for his performance — a historic win, as it made him the first black actor to win the Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series since 1998 — along with an Emmy the year before for his turn as Chris Darden in the first season of American Crime Story.

The actor beat out Jason Bateman of Ozark, Freddie Highmore of The Good Doctor, Bob Odenkirk of Better Call Saul, and Liev Schreiber of Ray Donovan for the win.

This year’s ceremony is the first to be held since Hollywood’s pervasive issues with saxual misconduct have been exposed. In conjunction with the Time’s Up movement, men and women wore black on the red carpet in protest and in solidarity. See all the photos from Sunday’s red carpet here.

In addition to the competitive awards, this year’s Golden Globes honored Oprah Winfrey, star of the upcoming A Wrinkle In Time, with the prestigious Cecil B. DeMille Award for “outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment.”

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association also honored several of last year’s best films and television shows with the golden globe awards as listed.

This Is Us, Fargo, and The Handmaid’s Tale tied for third place with three nods each. In terms of network, HBO nabbed 12 nominations total, while Netflix followed with nine, and FX with eight.

See full list of nominees below; winners are added as announced.

Best Motion Picture – Drama
Call Me By Your Name
Dunkirk
The Post
The Shape of Water
WINNER: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
The Disaster Artist
Get Out
The Greatest Showman
I, Tonya
WINNER: Lady Bird

Best Motion Picture – Animated
The Boss Baby
The Breadwinner
WINNER: Coco
Ferdinand
Loving Vincent

Best Motion Picture – Foreign Language
A Fantastic Woman
First They Killed My Father
WINNER: In the Fade
Loveless
The Square

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama
Jessica Chastain, Molly’s Game
Sally Hawkins, The Shape of Water
WINNER: Frances McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Meryl Streep, The Post
Michelle Williams, All the Money in the World

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama
Timothée Chalamet, Call Me By Your Name
Daniel Day-Lewis, Phantom Thread
Tom Hanks, The Post
WINNER: Gary Oldman, Darkest Hour
Denzel Washington, Roman J. Israel, Esq.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Judi Dench, Victoria & Abdul
Helen Mirren, The Leisure Seeker
Margot Robbie, I, Tonya
WINNER: Saoirse Ronan, Lady Bird
Emma Stone, Battle of the Saxes

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy
Steve Carell, Battle of the Saxes
Ansel Elgort, Baby Driver
WINNER: James Franco, The Disaster Artist
Hugh Jackman, The Greatest Showman
Daniel Kaluuya, Get Out

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Mary J. Blige, Mudbound
Hong Chau, Downsizing
WINNER: Allison Janney, I, Tonya
Laurie Metcalf, Lady Bird
Octavia Spencer, The Shape of Water

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in any Motion Picture
Willem Dafoe, The Florida Project
Armie Hammer, Call Me By Your Name
Richard Jenkins, The Shape of Water
Christopher Plummer, All the Money in the World
WINNER: Sam Rockwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

Best Director – Motion Picture
WINNER: Guillermo del Toro, The Shape of Water
Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Christopher Nolan, Dunkirk
Ridley Scott, All the Money in the World
Steven Spielberg, The Post

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Guillermo del Toro and Vanessa Taylor, The Shape of Water
Greta Gerwig, Lady Bird
Liz Hannah and Josh Singer, The Post
WINNER: Martin McDonagh, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
Aaron Sorkin, Molly’s Game

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
Carter Burwell, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri
WINNER: Alexandre Desplat, The Shape of Water
Jonny Greenwood, Phantom Thread
John Williams, The Post
Hans Zimmer, Dunkirk

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
“Home,” Ferdinand
“Mighty River,” Mudbound
“Remember Me,” Coco
“The Star,” The Star
WINNER: “This Is Me,” The Greatest Showman

Best Television Series – Drama
The Crown
Game of Thrones
WINNER: The Handmaid’s Tale
Stranger Things
This Is Us

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Blackish
WINNER: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Master of None
SMILF
Will & Grace

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
WINNER: Big Little Lies
Fargo
Feud: Bette and Joan
The Sinner
Top of the Lake: China Girl

Best Performance by an Actress in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Jessica Biel, The Sinner
WINNER: Nicole Kidman, Big Little Lies
Jessica Lange, Feud: Bette and Joan
Susan Sarandon, Feud: Bette and Joan
Reese Witherspoon, Big Little Lies

Best Performance by an Actor in a Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
Robert De Niro, The Wizard of Lies
Jude Law, The Young Pope
Kyle MacLachlan, Twin Peaks
WINNER: Ewan McGregor, Fargo
Geoffrey Rush, Genius

Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Caitriona Balfe, Outlander
Claire Foy, The Crown
Maggie Gyllenhaal, The Deuce
Katherine Langford, 13 Reasons Why
WINNER: Elisabeth Moss, The Handmaid’s Tale

Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Jason Bateman, Ozark
WINNER: Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us
Freddie Highmore, The Good Doctor
Bob Odenkirk, Better Call Saul
Liev Schreiber, Ray Donovan

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Pamela Adlon, Better Things
Alison Brie, GLOW
WINNER: Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Issa Rae, Insecure
Frankie Shaw, SMILF

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy
Anthony Anderson, Blackish
WINNER: Aziz Ansari, Master of None
Kevin Bacon, I Love Dick
William H. Macy, Shameless
Eric McCormack, Will & Grace

Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
WINNER: Laura Dern, Big Little Lies
Ann Dowd, The Handmaid’s Tale
Chrissy Metz, This Is Us
Michelle Pfeiffer, The Wizard of Lies
Shailene Woodley, Big Little Lies

Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television
David Harbour, Stranger Things
Alfred Molina, Feud: Bette and Joan
Christian Slater, Mr. Robot
WINNER: Alexander Skarsgard, Big Little Lies
David Thewlis, Fargo

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Kim Boateng

Kim Boateng

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