Women’s March 2018 : Millions Demand Equality, Pledge Resistance Against Trump

by Kim Boateng Posted on

Today’s 2018 Women’s March reportedly broke several state records for the largest gathering in history as millions of women in North American cities – and around the world – from New York City to Houston, and from Vancouver to Toronto, on Saturday, held protest rallies to demand equality and pledge resistance against Trump.

12 months ago, millions of women demonstrated in Washington, DC — and in cities around the US and the world — on the day after Donald Trump was sworn in as president. The march was an enormous show of defiance against Trump’s past disparaging comments about women, and policies seen as hostile to women.

One year on, women and their allies hit the streets once more in protest against what they say are anti-women policies by Trump and other conservative governments.

Hundreds of thousands of women took part in protests across the US, with roughly 200,000 people marching in New York City alone according to an NYPD estimate.

Demonstrations were also seen in Los Angeles, Houston, Austin, Dallas, Chicago, Denver, Austin, Montgomery, Charlotte, and in dozens of other cities and towns – literally every major city in the U.S. and some major cities in Canada.

More than 300,000 people attended Chicago’s march. At least 4,500 people marched in downtown Dallas, highlighting Texas’ diverse population. Thousands of protesters in Washington heard speeches from Democratic legislators, including House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California.

The Women’s March in Los Angeles drew 600,000 participants on Saturday as women across the country took to the streets in what was largely a protest against President Trump.

The gathering included addresses by female voices in Hollywood including Natalie Portman and Viola Davis.

With signs like ‘Real news, fake president,’ marchers supported female empowerment and denounced President Trump’s views on immigration, abortion, LGBT rights, women’s rights, civil rights and race.

Demonstrators denounced Trump’s views with colorful signs and even saltier language.

Oklahoma City protesters chanted “We need a leader, not a creepy tweeter!” One woman donned a T-shirt with the likeness of social justice icon Woody Guthrie, who wrote “This Land Is Your Land.”

Members of the group Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women of Seattle burned sage and chanted in front of Seattle’s rainy march.

The rally in Washington, happened amid a government shut-down that began at midnight. Activists met in front of the Lincoln Memorial before heading to the White House, carrying signs boasting slogans that included “Grab Him by the Mid-terms.” Other signs supported reproductive, immigration and health care rights.

Other events happened abroad in Beijing, Buenos Aires, Nairobi and Rome. Marches, under the social media banner #WeekendofWomen, also are scheduled for Sunday.

People march in Italy’s capital under the banner “Rome Rises”.

Waving signs reading “send Trump back to the golf course permanently” and “our button’s bigger than yours,” demonstrators gathered in front of Rome’s iconic Pantheon on Saturday morning.

The Piazza della Rotonda began to fill as a series of speakers, including actress Asia Argento, one of dozens of women to have alleged Harvey Weinstein sexually assaulted or harassed them, took to the stage to condemn inequality.

The movement is somewhat divided, however. Some women in conservative US states want to concentrate on political action and voter registration, while others want to focus on activism and social justice issues.

The #MeToo movement has sparked a global reckoning for sexual harassment, and marchers on Saturdy helped to amplify the message further, carrying signs calling for an end to sexual abuse.

Author

Kim Boateng

Kim Boateng

With a Degree in Environmental Sciences, Kim the self professed jack of all trades and master of some simply "goes there" and brings a level of attention and detail to Nigeria Circle's quest for excellence in investigative journalism that sets her apart. Before journalism she worked in Safety, Quality Assurance and Control in several industries.
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