Odd

Karen Fonseca F-Trump Truck Sign Sticker On Sale & Demand Is Intense

by Kim Boateng Posted on November 22nd, 2017

Houston, TX, USA : Karen Fonseca, the owner of the white Sierra truck with the “F*CK TRUMP AND F*CK YOU FOR VOTING FOR HIM” sticker, is selling the sticker decals for $15 a piece – demand for the hot-ticket item is intense – and their is a long waiting list.

Though the stickers were designed by the Fort Bend County Democrats, Karen Fonseca and her 12 Children have jumped in on the cause and started to sell the decals for $15 a piece.

“It’s turned into this bigger thing, everything is back ordered,” Ali Hasanali, a Fort Bend Democrats member, told local station KHOU. “We can’t print enough, even if they want to buy now there’s going to be a delay because we have to print a lot more up.”

Now a symbol for the Democratic group, Hasanali says Fonseca represents anyone willing to stand up against politicians who abuse their power.

“My hat’s off to Karen for being forthcoming and not being pressured or intimidated,” Hasanali added. “She’s a rallying cry for anyone who cares about individual liberties.”

According to Hasanali, money raised from the decal sales will go toward a voter registration drive that will help get elderly voters to the polls.

Fonseca later told the station that she also plans on selling a new decal: “F*CK TROY NEHLS AND F*CK YOU FOR VOTING FOR HIM” for the same double-digit price. The decal is currently placed right next to the anti-Trump sticker on her truck.

Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls later said he was “not surprised” by the new addition and that he found it “somewhat disgusting.”

“I never chose to be in the news at all,” Fonseca told reporters Tuesday, “until Troy Nehls made it public on his personal Facebook page.”

The Fonseca family gained overnight fame after Nehls took to his official Facebook page to threaten legal charges against the owners of the truck. The Texas sheriff stated that the station’s prosecutor “would accept disorderly charges regarding [the F*ck Trump sticker].”

Though the official later backed down, he informed critics that he was merely concerned with preventing a potential road-rage incident triggered by the sticker.

Days after the story went viral, Fonseca was arrested for an outstanding warrant dating back to 2014. She was later released on bond.

“I’m almost certain it does have to do with this,” Fonseca told the media after posting bail. “People abuse the badge, and in my opinion, money talks. When you’re in politics, people know how to work the system.”

Speaking at a news conference Monday, Fonseca said that she is considering a civil rights lawsuit against the sheriff “regarding the injustice against” her.

EARLIER : Karen Fonseca : Woman With F-Trump Truck Sign Arrested For Alleged Fraud – Karen Fonseca, the woman who has been seen in the Houston area driving a pickup truck displaying an expletive-laden message opposing President Donald Trump and his supporters has been arrested.

Fort Bend County Sheriff’s Office records show Karen Fonseca was arrested about 2 p.m. Thursday on an outstanding fraud warrant issued in August by the Rosenberg Police Department. She remained in the county jail Thursday night with bond set at $1,500.

Fonseca was released from jail Thursday night after her husband posted her bond.

“I’m almost certain it does have to do with (the truck decal),” she said after her release. “People abuse the badge, and in my opinion, money talks. When you’re in politics, people know how to work the system.”

A sheriff’s spokesman has not answered a message seeking details behind the warrant.

Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls had threatened Fonseca with a disorderly conduct charge over the decal. However, District Attorney John Healey said he didn’t think it would have been a prosecutable case.

Fonseca had said she would not remove the decal. She said she had been stopped by law officers, but that they have no grounds to issue a citation.

“It’s not to cause hate or animosity,” the 46-year-old Fonseca said “It’s just our freedom of speech and we’re exercising it.”

Fort Bend County Sheriff Troy Nehls had threatened Fonseca with a disorderly conduct charge over the decal. However, District Attorney John Healey said he didn’t think it would have been a prosecutable case.

Nehls on Wednesday posted a photo of the truck message on Facebook alongside a request to speak with the driver.

Nehls in his post said that a county prosecutor told him the message could warrant a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct. But at a news conference later Wednesday, he seemed to back away from that idea. Nehls said he supports freedom of speech but worried that profane messages could incite others and lead to confrontations that would disturb the peace he’s pledged to keep.

A spokeswoman for the sheriff’s office, which covers the county just southwest of Houston, said Thursday that Nehls’ post was removed once the pickup driver was identified.

“Due to the hate messages he has been receiving toward his wife and children, the sheriff will not be commenting on the matter further,” spokeswoman Caitilin Espinosa said by email.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Texas posted on Facebook that Fonseca’s message is protected speech and urged her to reach out to the organization. The ACLU noted a 1971 U.S. Supreme Court case that overturned the conviction of a man for disturbing the peace for wearing a jacket with an expletive as part of an effort to protest the military draft and the Vietnam War.

A woman who raised her middle finger in October to Trump’s motorcade as it passed her in Virginia was fired from a government contracting firm for violating the “code of conduct policy.” But the Texas case differs in that a government entity threatened punitive action for vulgar material directed at the president.

Lynne Rambo, a law professor at Texas A&M University specializing in the First Amendment, said Thursday that the 1971 Supreme Court case made two points clear: the state’s attempt to regulate profanity or civil discourse is not a sufficient reason to justify restricting speech, and profane language directed at a specific person is different from vulgar content that’s broadly disseminated.

“It’s state action to threaten as (Nehls) did and he really ought to know First Amendment law better than that,” Rambo said.

Fonseca says the message has been on the rear window of the pickup for nearly a year and it’ll stay there for the time-being.

“There’s no law against freedom of speech, nothing in the law book here in Texas,” she said “I’ve been stopped numerous times, but they can’t write me a ticket.”

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Kim Boateng

Kim Boateng

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