Couple Married For 75 yrs Killed In California Wildfires

by Kim Boateng Posted on October 12th, 2017

Sacramento, California: A couple married for 75 years are among at least 21 people confirmed dead in the California wildfires. The couple were identified as 100-year-old Charles Rippey and his wife 98-year-old Sara Rippey by their children.

Mike Rippey said Tuesday his brother had discovered their parent’s bodies after driving to the home and managing to get past security.

He said his father Charles appeared to be heading to the room of his mother, Sara, when he was overcome by the smoke and flames.

“My father certainly wouldn’t have left her,” Mike Rippey said.

The couple had met in grade school in Wisconsin and been together ever since, celebrating their 75th anniversary last year.

Mike Rippey, 71, said he and his siblings couldn’t imagine how either parent would have navigated life if just one had survived the flames.

“We knew there’s no way they would ever be happy, whoever was the last one. So they went together, and that’s the way it worked,” he said stoically.

In the charred remains of the home, only metal and porcelain survived to testify to the couple’s long life together. There were coffee cups along a low sill; two metal chairs, side-by-side by a patio table; and a porcelain tea set of white and soft washes of blue, some pieces still intact.

Mike Rippey said his parents  that died in the Northern California fire was together since grade school.

Authorities are expecting other older people to be among the dead, who like the Rippeys might not have been able to move fast enough to beat the flames.

Mike Rippey said his mother had previously suffered a stroke.

Mike Rippey was in London and boarding a flight to California when his brother called and told him their parents had died.

The couple attended the University of Wisconsin and married in 1942 before Charles Rippey served as a U.S. Army engineer in World War II. He became an executive with the Firestone tire company.

Mike Rippey said he had no plans to rebuild the home.

“Without them, it doesn’t mean a thing,” he said. “It’s gone. They’re gone.”

At least 21 people are confirmed dead, hundreds missing and thousands homeless in the California wildfires, officials said today in an update. More than 200 fire engines and firefighting crews from around the country were being rushed to California on Wednesday to help battle the infernos.

“This is a serious, critical, catastrophic event,” California fire chief Ken Pimlott told reporters. “We’re not going to be out of the woods for a great number of days to come.”

Pimlott said that after a respite on Tuesday winds were kicking up again on Wednesday and the winds and dry conditions were hampering efforts to contain the blazes.

“We are still impacted by five years of drought,” the director of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) said.

“These fires were driven by the critically dry fuel bed,” he added. “We are literally looking at explosive vegetation.”

Pimlott said the death toll from the fires — among the deadliest ever in California — had risen to 21 and could be expected to go up further.

Eleven of the deaths have occurred in Sonoma County, a wine-producing region which has been particularly hard hit, while six people have died in Mendocino County. There have been two deaths in Napa County and two in Yuba County.

Entire neighborhoods in Santa Rosa, a city of 175,000 which is the county seat of Sonoma County, have been reduced to ashes.

Thousands of people have been left homeless and 25,000 people have evacuated their homes in Sonoma County alone to escape, according to officials.

More than 3,500 homes and businesses have been destroyed including several wineries in Sonoma and Napa counties, the heart of the state’s wine production.

Hundreds of people have been reported missing in Sonoma County but the county sheriff’s department said it expected most of them would eventually be located.

Pimlott said firefighters were battling a total of 22 wildfires that have burned nearly 170,000 acres (68,800 hectares) and reinforcements had been requested.

He said 170 fire engines had been ordered from the neighboring states of Arizona, Nevada, Oregon and Washington and another 154 engines from elsewhere around the country.

In addition, 60 firefighting crews from other states were on their way to California to provide assistance, he said.

“Our primary goal is to get these resources into the fires,” Pimlott said.

He said 73 helicopters, 30 air tankers and nearly 8,000 firefighters were currently taking part in the effort to extinguish the blazes.

California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. earlier declared a state of emergency for Napa, Sonoma and Yuba counties due to the effects of multiple fires, including the Tubbs and Atlas fires, which have damaged critical infrastructure, threatened thousands of homes and caused the evacuation of residents.

President Donald Trump has declared a major disaster in California, freeing up federal funding and resources to help fight the fires, and Governor Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency in eight counties.

The US military has also been enlisted to battle the fires with 700 servicemen currently helping out and an additional 1,800 being mobilized.

Much of the damage in Santa Rosa can be seen from US Route 101, the north-south highway which runs from California through Oregon to Washington state.

The Sonoma County Hilton perched on a hill overlooking Route 101 is a ruin of charred wood and twisted metal, as is the nearby Fountaingrove Inn.

An enormous K-Mart store has been entirely destroyed with only a couple of blackened walls still standing.

Among the wineries which reportedly suffered damage were William Hill Estate Winery in Napa, Signorello Vineyards, Stags’ Leap and Chimney Rock.

Forest fires are common in the western United States during dry, hot months but, with 21 deaths so far, this year’s California fires are among the deadliest ever.

The Griffith Park fire in Los Angeles County in 1933 killed at least 29 people and 25 people died in the 1991 Oakland Hills fire.

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Kim Boateng

Kim Boateng

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